Dementia

Asian Pacific Islander Dementia Care Network

The Asian Pacific Islander Dementia Care Network in Los Angeles (API DCN) addresses gaps in the community-based continuum of care for API's by expanding culturally and linguistically competent services for caregivers and building the capacity of community-based partner agencies in Los Angeles. Asian Pacific Islander Dementia Care Network is a 2010 recipient of The Rosalinde Gilbert Innovations in Alzheimer's Disease Caregiving Legacy Award for the Diverse & Multicultural Communities category.

Organization:

Alzheimer and Dementia Workgroup (Mountain Projects, Inc)

The Alzheimer & Dementia Workgroup's overarching goal is to increase awareness and support individuals with Alzheimer's disease and other related dementia and their caregivers. Alzheimer & Dementia Workgroup is a 2010 recipient of The Rosalinde Gilbert Innovations in Alzheimer's Disease Caregiving Legacy Award for the Policy & Advocacy category.

Organization:

Mountain Projects, Inc

Befriending Carers of People with Dementia...

Befriending carers of people with dementia: Randomised controlled trial

Citation Charlesworth, G., Shepstone, L., Wilson, E., Reynolds, S., Mugford, M., Price, D., Harvey, I., & Poland, F. (2008). Befriending carers of people with dementia: Randomized controlled trial. BMJ, 336, 1295-1297.

Design Randomized controlled trial

Long-Term Effects of Bereavement and Caregiver Intervention...

Long-term effects of bereavement and caregiver intervention on dementia caregiver depressive symptoms

Citation Haley, W., Bergman, E.J., Roth, D.L., McVie, T., Gaugler, J.E., & Mittelman, M, S. (2008). Long-term effects of bereavement and caregiver intervention on dementia caregiver depressive symptoms. The Gerontologist, 48(6), 732-740

Design Quasi-experiment

Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the joint effects of bereavement and caregiver intervention on caregiver depressive symptoms.

Ethnicity and Time to Institutionalization of Dementia Patients . . .

Ethnicity and time to institutionalization of dementia patients: A comparison of latina and caucasian female family caregivers

Citation Coon, David, W., et al. (2004). Ethnicity and time to institutionalization of dementia patients: A comparison of latina and caucasian female family caregivers. Journal of American Geriatrics Society, 52, 1077-1084.

Design Randomized, Longitudinal study

Caregiver Wisdom: Answering . . . and Answering Again

(from a Letter to the husband caregiver of a wife with Alzheimer’s Disease) 

I’d be surprised if there’s anyone [caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s Disease] who hasn’t experienced the endlessly repetitive questions.

Your wife asks the same question again and again because she does not remember you’ve just answered it―or even that she has ever asked it before.  But for some reason she does remember it’s important to her to know the answer, so she asks.  Because she knows she can depend on you to know the answer.

In My Family, It’s What We Do

When I was in the fourth grade, my mom retired from her high-powered position in order to stay home with me. She became a “bake cookies, go to the PTA meeting, host the girl scout meeting” kind of mom who never said no to anyone who needed help.  She was all about others and never about herself.    

When I grew up, Mama became my best friend.  She was the one I called to talk to about everything and about nothing. She spoiled our kids rotten and giggled while she did it. She was selfless and her grandchildren were her world.  That’s the mama I remember. 

He Disguised it Well . . . But I Knew

My husband disguised it well, but I knew. I had known for the last seven or eight years. He was sixty-five and I was forty-seven. We had been married for sixteen years. The eighteen years between us never made a difference. His sense of humor, wit, intelligence, and gift of gab were incomparable, his laughter contagious. He was a knight in shining armor for me and for his family. He had always surpassed me mentally and physically. Until 1991 when my husband was demoted, without notice or explanation, from his new position as president of a furniture company that spans three states.

Guarding My Own Health . . .

Crafted from fine cotton yarn, the black cardigan sweater became a staple in my spring wardrobe after my mother bought it for me 10 years ago. Rediscovering it in the back of my closet last week, I suddenly recalled a happier memory of Mom—a time when I wasn’t overwhelmed by what social workers describe as “caregiver burnout.” And then came an unexpected flood of tears.

Sharing the MS Journey

Let's face it! We have MS. Actually, only my wife has primary progressive multiple sclerosis. But, having made the choice, I share the journey as her primary caregiver. We are now in our mid 60's but far from finished!

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