Dementia

Downsizing a Home: A Checklist for Caregivers

Introduction

Moving is a high-stress life event, the experts tell us, and they're right. Whether it's cross-town or cross-country, whether to a small apartment or a large suburban home, tackling the organizing, packing, discarding, cleaning, paperwork and the myriad other tasks is a major challenge.

When you're older and moving from the family home to a new smaller residence, possibly in a new community or your adult child's home, sorting through decades of family history and possessions can feel overwhelming—even paralyzing.

Toileting (Dementia)

  • Set up the bathroom to make it as easy as possible for the person to get on to and off of the toilet, e.g. having a raised toilet seat and grab bars.
  • Notice when the person gives a sign about needing to use the toilet, e.g. agitation, fidgeting, tugging on clothing, wandering, touching the genital area. Have a routine and take the person to the bathroom on a regular schedule, e.g. every two hours. You may have to respond quickly if someone indicates they need to use the bathroom.

Incontinence (Dementia)

Tips for caregivers of those with dementia experiencing incontinence:

  • Talk to the physician to see if medication, enlarged prostate or a urinary tract infection might be causing the problem, especially if there is a sudden onset of incontinence.

Dressing and Grooming (Dementia)

 

Dressing and Grooming (Dementia)

 

  • Simplify clothing choices by putting out an outfit for the care receiver to wear, or give an option of two outfits. Do not ask open-ended questions like, "What do you want to wear?"—this kind of question can overwhelm someone with dementia.

Communication (Dementia)

Communication (Dementia)

  • People respond to our body posture, facial expression and tone of voice more than our actual words. Your upbeat mood can help keep the person you are dealing with remain calmer.
  • You need to pay attention to the non verbal clues the person you are caring for is giving you. Understanding his/her feelings may be more important than the content of the conversation. Acknowledge feelings whenever possible.

Dental Care (Dementia)

 

Dental Care (Dementia)

  • Dental hygiene is important for overall health. Poor dental hygiene may lead to heart disease, gingivitis, stroke, osteoporosis and respiratory disease. In addition to causing bad breath, it can also affect one's ability to eat, chew and talk. Certain medications can cause "dry mouth." Dry mouth makes it more difficult to eat and swallow, produce saliva, and causes tongue irritation.

AoA Announces Availability of Approximately $2.25 Million for Lifespan Respite Care Programs

AoA Announces Availability of Approximately $2.25 Million for Lifespan Respite Care Programs

The deadline to apply is June 7, 2010

Gilbert Awards 2009: Ceremony

Three Outstanding Programs

Receive Their Awards!

2008 Awardees

"... Art has an integral role to play in [...] enriching the lives of people affected by dementia and their caregivers. We are honored to accept this visionary award in the category of Creative Expression and thank the Alliance and the Foundation..."

Amir Parsa
Meet Me at MoMA

Here But Not Here—Finding Hope When a Loved One Has Memory Loss

(Aired on: November 14, 2007)

Making Hard Choices: Respecting Both Voices

Findings from a groundbreaking research study exploring choice and decision-making in everyday care for persons with cognitive impairment and their family caregivers. The study makes policy and practice recommendations to advance knowledge on consumer direction and dementia care.

Publication available in hardcopy only.

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