Frontotemporal Dementia

Could it Be Their Brain? A Frontotemporal Dementia Checklist

A Frontotemporal Dementia Checklist for Family and Friends

Communication (Dementia)

Communication (Dementia)

  • People respond to our body posture, facial expression and tone of voice more than our actual words. Your upbeat mood can help keep the person you are dealing with remain calmer.
  • You need to pay attention to the non verbal clues the person you are caring for is giving you. Understanding his/her feelings may be more important than the content of the conversation. Acknowledge feelings whenever possible.

AoA Announces Availability of Approximately $2.25 Million for Lifespan Respite Care Programs

AoA Announces Availability of Approximately $2.25 Million for Lifespan Respite Care Programs

The deadline to apply is June 7, 2010

A Guide to Taking Care of Yourself

"The care you give to yourself is the care you give to your loved one," said a caregiver. Absolutely the easiest thing for someone to say and the hardest thing to accept is the advice to take care of yourself as a caregiver. It is often hard to see beyond the care tasks that await you each morning.

Guidelines for Better Communication with Brain Impaired Adults

Communicating with a loved one with a brain disorder can indeed be challenging. Finding the right words and getting your point across are difficult under normal circumstances.This difficulty is often compounded by your role as a caregiver. And although there are no easy solutions, following some basic guidelines should ease communication, and lower levels of stress both for you and for the care recipient.

Frontotemporal Dementia

Definition

Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD) is a degenerative condition of the front (anterior) part of the brain. It differs from other causes of dementia such as Alzheimer’s, Lewy Body and Creutzfeldt Jakob’s diseases. FTD is currently understood as a clinical syndrome that groups together Pick's disease, primary progressive aphasia and semantic dementia. The areas of the brain affected by FTD—the frontal and anterior temporal lobes—control reasoning, personality, movement, speech, social graces, language and some aspects of memory.

Caring for Adults with Cognitive and Memory Impairment

Caregiving: A Universal Occupation

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