New to Caregiving

Siblings and Caregiving

Old wounds and rivalries can come into play, making compromise about care decisions challenging

The doctor has informed you that your mother can no longer live independently. You feel that assisted living would be the best solution but your sister strongly disagrees. It seemed that at one time you were able to communicate with her, but not any longer . . . .

Hands-On Skills for Caregivers

When you’re a caregiver, finding time to take care of your own physical needs is difficult enough, but taking care of the physical needs of someone else is even more challenging. Assisting someone else to dress, bathe, sit or stand when they are upset, agitated or combative—often the case when caring for someone with a brain disorder such as Alzheimer’s disease—requires special strategies. The following five techniques can make taking care of a loved one’s physical needs easier.

¿Es una demencia? ¿Que significa ese diagnóstico? (Is this Dementia and What Does it Mean?)

Introducción

¿Qué quiere decir el diagnóstico de demencia? Para algunas personas, esta palabra provoca temibles imágenes de conducta "loca" y descontrolada. En realidad, la palabra "demencia" describe un grupo de síntomas entre los cuales está n la pérdida de la memoria a corto plazo, la confusión, la incapacidad para resolver problemas, la incapacidad para ejecutar tareas complejas como cocinar o llevar las cuentas de gastos y, a veces, alteraciones de la personalidad o comportamientos inusuales.

California's Caregiver Resource Centers

Every year, California's nonprofit Caregiver Resource Centers (CRCs), serve more than 14,000 families and caregivers of adults affected by chronic and debilitating health conditions including dementia, Alzheimer's disease, cerebrovascular diseases (such as stroke or aneurysms), degenerative diseases such as Parkinson's, Huntington's and multiple sclerosis, or traumatic brain injury (TBI), among many others.

Holding a Family Meeting

When taking care of an elderly parent or another relative, family members need to work cooperatively. The more people participating in care, the less alone a caregiver feels in his/her role. Books and articles about caregiving often mention the family meeting as a way to facilitate this process. But how does one go about having such a meeting?

La Apoplejia o Derrame Cerebral (Stroke)

Definición

Un derrame cerebral es una lesión cerebral, que se produce cuando se interrumpe o se reduce ampliamente el riego sanguíneo del cerebro; éste se queda sin oxígeno ni nutrientes y, en cuestión de minutos, comienzan a morir las células cerebrales. Por lo tanto, un derrame cerebral se considera una emergencia médica y requiere que se lo diagnostique y se lo trate sin demora.

Planificación legal en casos de incapacidad (Legal Planning for Incapacity)

P: ¿Cuáles son los problemas legales a analizar cuando un integrante de la familia padece la enfermedad de Alzheimer u otro trastorno cerebral?

Hay distintos problemas legales que se deben tomar en cuenta cuando una persona esté incapacitada (o pueda estarlo en el futuro):

LGBT Caregiving: Frequently Asked Questions

Government agencies, nonprofit organizations and the media have focused increasing attention on the needs of seniors and those who provide them with support, assistance or care. Less attention has been focused on the needs of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) older adults and in particular, their caregivers, whether partners, friends or other family members. Many of the issues you or your loved one may confront—such as where to turn for help, what kinds of programs can support caregivers, how to access services—overlap with those faced by heterosexuals.

Work and Eldercare

Introduction

More than ever before, caregiving is recognized as a key element of everyday life for millions of families throughout the United States. As our population ages, more families are providing care for an older adult at home, and an increasing number of people will need such care in the future. Current demographic and healthcare trends make this issue even more significant:

Hiring In-Home Help

Introduction


Most family caregivers reach a point when they realize they need help at home. Tell-tale signs include recognizing that your loved one requires constant supervision and/or assistance with everyday activities, such as bathing and dressing. Caregivers also find that certain housekeeping routines and regular errands are accomplished with great difficulty or are left undone. It may become apparent that in order to take care of any business outside the home, more than one caregiver is required.

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