Statistics

Caregiver Health

A Population at Risk

An estimated 44 million Americans age 18 and older provide unpaid assistance and support to older people and adults with disabilities who live in the community.1 The value of this unpaid labor force is estimated to be at least $306 billion annually,2 nearly double the combined costs of home health care ($43 billion) and nursing home care ($115 billion).3

Caregiving Across the States: 50 State Profiles (2014)

Caregiving Across the States: 50 State Profiles - 2014 Update

 

Caregivers at Risk

Family Caregiver Alliance’s statewide survey of California caregivers of brain-impaired adults (those with Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, traumatic brain injury, Parkinson’s disease, etc.), revealed:

Women and Caregiving: Facts and Figures

Who Are the Caregivers?

Most older persons with long-term care needs—65%—rely exclusively on family and friends to provide assistance.1 Another 30% will supplement family care with assistance from paid providers.2 Care provided by family and friends can determine whether older persons can remain at home. In fact, 50% of the elderly who have a long-term care need but no family available to care for them are in nursing homes, while only 7% who have a family caregiver are in institutional settings.3

 

Selected Long-Term Care Statistics

What is Long-Term Care?

Incidence and Prevalence of the Major Causes of Brain Impairment

Overview

Many of the diseases and disorders that affect the brain are progressive and their incidence and prevalence increase with age. Caring for those with adult-onset brain impairments frequently becomes a 24-hour, 7-day a week role. As the population ages, the need for care and for understanding the impact of these disorders on families becomes even more pressing.

Selected Caregiver Statistics

Fact Sheet: Selected Caregiver Statistics

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