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Background Checking for Hired Care: Resources that Help

Stories fill the news about aides who take advantage of, rather than care for, a parent, spouse or other family member in their home. Drained savings accounts, missing jewelry, and unexplained bruises are all too common experiences. One way to avoid becoming a victim is to conduct an attendant background check. Background checks include: a review of job performance and verification that the information provided to the family caregiver is accurate, and the attendant can do the job that the caregiver needs to be done.

Resources for Assistive Technology

For assistance finding and purchasing AT:

ABLEDATA
(800) 227-0216
www.abledata.com

Alliance for Technology Access
(415) 455-4575
www.ataccess.org

Center for Assistive Technology &
Environmental Access
(800) 726-9119
www.assistivetech.net

Technology for Long-Term Care
(215) 371-1354
www.techforltc.org

 

Choosing Assistive Technology

Assistive Technology—also called assistive devices, independent living aids, and adaptive equipment—can help your loved one live more independently. It may also make your job as a caregiver easier and more enjoyable.

Evaluating Medical Research

Hardly a day goes by without a story on television, in the newspaper, or on the Internet about new medical research findings. You might hear about a new drug to treat Alzheimer’s, a promising “cure” for cancer, or a breakthrough discovery in Parkinson’s disease. Or you might see articles about particular foods or dietary supplements that are said to promote health or prevent or slow the course of an illness. Should you try to get these drugs for a family member who is sick? Should the person change his diet? Take more vitamins?

National Consensus Project for Caregiver Assessment

National Consensus Project for Caregiver Assessment: Translating Research into Policy and Practice

Routinely, people with chronic or disabling conditions are assessed by professionals in medical, health and social service settings to determine what services or treatments they need. Family caregivers, however, have not had the same experience.

Definitions

What Do We Mean By.....

Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) – everyday tasks related to personal care usually performed for oneself in the course of a normal day, including bathing, dressing, grooming, eating, walking, taking medications, and other personal care activities.

HIV-Associated Dementia

Introduction

Since the start of the AIDS epidemic more than two decades ago, doctors, caregivers and patients themselves have observed that some people with the disease experience declines in brain function and movement skills as well as slight or sudden shifts in behavior and mood.

Caregiving and the holidays: from stress to success!

For many caregivers the holiday season gives rise to stress, frustration and anger, instead of peace and good will.

Caregivers may feel resentful towards other family members who they feel have not offered enough assistance. Managing care for someone who has a cognitive impairment may leave caregivers feeling that they will not be able to participate as fully as they would like in family gatherings. Already feeling overwhelmed with caregiving tasks, stressed-out caregivers may view traditional holiday preparations as more of a drain of precious energy than a joy.

Traumatic Brain Injury - CA Resources

The following are some of the organizations that provide services to families dealing with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) in California:

The Traumatic Brain Injury Services of California
www.tbisca.org

Ten real-life strategies for dementia caregiving

As caregivers, we often use intuition to help us decide what to do. No one ever gave us lessons on how to relate to someone with memory loss. Unfortunately, dealing with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias is counter-intuitive; i.e., often the right thing to do is exactly opposite that which seems like the right thing to do. Here is some practical advice:

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